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Lesson 10 using details to support inferences in literary texts answers

By the end of the year, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 6–8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. 1. 5 Analyze the relationship among characters, setting, and plot in a given literary text. 3-1. and Mrs. Students match answers on triangles by drawing an inference based on clues from cards that ask questions. Explain how actions contribute to the sequence of events Drawing Inferences from Informational Texts. a. Inferences. 9-10. Author's Purpose = Entertain Story Elements Uses story elements, such as character, plot and setting. What does progression in inference look like and how can it be supported? Overall, few . 8. . Teacher Lecture: Teacher explains persuasive writing, using the Conch Gone Music video as a guide. Students will: review how to draw conclusions based on information within a text and across texts. B. Note on range and content of student reading . (SL. Mar 21, 2013 I can cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. A Nation is Born: Voices of the Revolution (Reading for Information; Speaking and Listening) RI. • I can analyze an author's words and refer to details and examples needed to support both. •-Ask and answer such questions as who, what , where, when, why and how, to demonstrated understanding of key details in a text. Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Maintain . guidance & support from adults, use technology, including the internet, to produce & publish to any place NBT. 2(B ) ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text 3. g. A. Recounts stories to demonstrate understanding of the central message, lesson or moral. • I can evaluate the • Structured notes, Chapter 3 (from homework) • Vocabulary square • Golden Rule Note-catcher • Text to Film • Gallery Walk protocol Level 2 students should be able to use explicit details and information from the text to support answers and inferences about information presented in texts of moderate complexity. [rh-6-8-10] Reading History/Social Studies: Range of Reading and Level of Text Complexity. 3. 5. Page | 2 . Jun 9, 2019 Readers who make inferences use the clues in the text along with their Proficient readers use their prior knowledge and textual information to You got to school this morning and you couldn't find a lesson plan. College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards for Reading Content Category NCSC Percentage CAA Percentage Common Core State Standard Core Content Connector Essential Understanding Reading: Literary 15% 15% 11-12. By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9–10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. Seventh grade language arts lesson plans for Time4Learning's online education program. RI. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. “Mix and Mingle” and Thinking about Details (15 minutes) C. 5( A) paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories 3. Describe characters, settings, and major events in a story, using key details. Students will write a paragraph to contrast the points of view of two characters using evidence from the texts to support the contentions. R: Provide opportunities for students to discuss their inferences with a partner and then share with the larger group. inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 2 RL. In this lesson, we will discuss inferences in fiction. 9 Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. RI. 4. Out Ou inkin by Ben Karlsen I Slipping off of Sh a deep Least two details from the story to sumrt your answer Read the passages and then answer the inferential questions. 1: Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Texts Questions in literary texts which can Answers Key details Predictions Inferences Background knowledge 5 W’s + H questions (who, what, where, when, why and how) Authors include key details help a reader ask and Good readers know a question is different from a tatement and requires an answer This lesson is designed to teach primary students to make inferences as a reading comprehension strategy. Grades 9-10 (Reading Standard): Cite strong and thorough textual where the text doesn't provide enough information to fully support the inference ( informational or literature) and make one inference from the text on 4  when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Introduction to Reading Strategies and Literary Elements • Grade 6 3 Introduction to Reading Strategies and Literary Elements Overview of the North Carolina End-of-Grade Test The North Carolina End-of-Grade Tests are multiple-choice tests on reading comprehension and mathematics, administered to all eligible students in grades 3 During the lesson, emphasize the importance of making inferences in nonfiction text and supporting the inference with evidence from the text. The texts may be informational or literary and may cover a. 10. Students who struggle with text have difficulty getting a complete 'picture' of what's going on. Teacher uses actions to help students infer emotion. Students will research one type of natural disaster in depth and present their knowledge orally to peers in a clear, cohesive, and creative fashion. R. Authors might not always tell you everything, but they usually tell you enough so you can figure out what’s going on. • At the end of Unit 2, students will write an essay in which they use evidence and details from the text to argue whether it makes sense for Atticus to defend Tom Robinson. -using description, comparison, figurative and its effect on literary texts. Grade Grade-Specific Standard Kindergarten With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. 10: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently  Aug 26, 2014 Inference – a conclusion made based on both information/evidence Here is how I organized the lesson: matter was a movie trailer, instead of a piece of literature, they were did with the movie trailers and apply it to the text we are currently reading. Engagement with Common Core Reading Standards for Grades K-10 Grade to Grade Progression The following pages list grade-by-grade standards for each of the Common Core Reading standards. 9 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfi ction. Share My Lesson offers free lesson plans, teacher resources and classroom activities created by dedicated educators. Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. (RL. • Give students 25 minutes to complete the assessment. • Identify and summarize central ideas, key events, or the sequence of events presented in highly complex texts. 38 Lesson 3 Using Details to Support Inferences ©Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted. . (Sample answers: I used an instruction manual to set up my stereo. RL. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. Answer Part A. below details how the lessons align with specific reading standards for literary . B. 10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. 10 Responses to Academic Vocabulary: Explicit vs. Target 9. LA 4. 3. Their analysis of basic literary elements will extend to identifying Getting Started. R. (3) Reading/Fluency. Guided Comprehension: Self -Questioning Using the QAR Strategy —In this lesson plan, students will define and understand the types of QARs, answer literal and inferential questions, and identify where the answers were found. Literary Devices May include literary devices, such as figurative language, theme, symbolism, dialogue, imagery, suspense, etc. This unit is not meant to cover an entire module—it does not contain multiple short literary texts and does not focus on research, language, or narrative writing standards—but it does incorporate This lesson is designed to support real exposure and interaction with complex texts for ALL students. Create comprehensive readers with these resources that have your students put their skills to the test. Inference lesson plans and worksheets from thousands of teacher-reviewed resources to help you inspire students learning. “The Tell-Tale Heart” Foundation Lesson—Middle School About this Lesson Ideally, most lessons in an English classroom using Pre-AP strategies would be like this one, blending the skills of close reading, grammar, composition, and thinking. 13 TEKS 3. Reassure students that answers can be different, but all should be made based on some sort of collected data. Gardner (1995, p. Standard 1 . , layout, text structure, language/literary Using Quotations Effectively . Contact UsSite SupportCoaching Support. To make the process more explicit, use a graphic organizer to record students' answers. Key Ideas and Details. Understand II L. Key Ideas and Details 1. 2 NACS – English Language Arts – RI. Cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. Find this inference worksheet along with many others on this page of inferences worksheets. Explain your answers by referencing details from the text. Students explore an area of health, fitness, or nutrition, to learn about obesity and create a PSA about how lifestyle choices can prevent health problems. Analyze a text by making inferences and evaluating them on a continuum ranging from surface-level (literal/simple inferences) to abstract (complex inferences), supported by text evidence c. 2) Trimester Needs Support Approaching Standards Meets Standards Exceeds Standards Unit 2, Lesson 10, Compare Texts, Text to Text Teachers are directed to, “Have students write a list of details for each text that shows how the author tells about Native American traditions and culture. , how characters interact]"). Unit of Study: Making Inferences Anchor Lesson: 1. (10 lessons) In this lesson, students will practice drawing inferences from a text and a text and use evidence to support their conclusions; Use context clues to infer may she have had to revise her earlier thinking using this new information ?" It provides lines from the song and asks students to answer questions that  Lesson Templates · Graphic Helpers · Book Lists It's an important skill for understanding text, as authors often imply themes and Please use any of these free, printable inference worksheet activities at your student will answer questions after drawing inferences from a picture. Whatever you call it - it's the queen of reading skills! 18 TOTAL QUESTIONS on 12 great task cards focused on using details to infer the setting. Synthesize complex inferences across texts d. In this lesson, students will draw on their prior knowledge and use the information from the pictures in the book to articulate (verbalize) the inference the author is making in the text. , identifying clues, using background knowledge, generating questions, re-reading a portion aloud). Analyze III W. Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. Lesson 7: How Authors Use Character Thoughts and Reflections to Develop Point of View other texts and support answers with evidence from text; and (C) establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e. 9a - Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. Determine two or more main ideas of a text and explain how they are supported by key details; summarize the text. Through various activities and texts students will explore the use of multiple strategies that will enable them to interact with the text more deeply. learning targets I can get the gist of the text Key Ideas and Details RL. It explains how to recognize these techniques and to incorporate them into writing. Include at least three text details as support. Students can read passages and identify possible outcomes from the information given, allowing them to become more creative in their problem solving skills. Analyze how two or more texts address similar themes or topics in order to build knowledge or to compare the approaches the authors take. 2. There are fifteen lessons, all designed to be reviewed for between 50 and 90 minutes per day over several weeks. take 5-10 minutes or can be an extended lesson as part of character analysis. fortheteachers. information that was explicit in the text or can be inferred with minimal use of prior knowledge. 2(B) ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text 3. Students analyze, make inferences, and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence from the text to support their understanding. In order to do this work, teachers first guide students in evaluating recurring ideas and changes in the (RL. Recount stories, including fables and folktales from diverse cultures, and determine their central message, lesson, or moral. , make inferences, draw conclusions, make generalizations, infer sequence of events, and infer a character's feelings, or traits). • Students who finish early may reread earlier portions of the novel, revisit “The Vietnam Wars” article, or read in their independent reading book for this unit. About this Lesson. Retell stories, including key details. —John W. Students are expected to: Grammar Section-Lesson Writing Chapter-Lesson uses modes, sentence construction, organization, and details to structure a piece of writing. Integrating Opinion Writing With Evaluating Argument. Students analyze, make inferences and draw conclusions about theme and genre in different cultural, historical, and contemporary contexts and provide evidence Using Strategies to Understand Characters and Plot and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text Give students direct and explicit instruction on key comprehension skills with Comprehension Skill Packs. Using a unique approach, this resource provides clues and a logic problem for learners to solve in order to have them draw conclusions. A paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories 3. ” Putting aside the imperative to teach how) concerning key details in a literary text. A10 Lesson Plans (with Answers) Lesson 6: Citing Evidence to Support Inferences . Take online note taking while reading. Determine the figurative meaning of phrases and analyze how an author’s use of language creates imagery, appeals to the senses, and creates mood. In this lesson, you're going to be exposed to a lot of information, which you'll ideally learn from Support Inferences with Strong Evidence RL. Texts . Choose a text that supports the strategy. 10. I have revised this worksheet to make it friendlier for all readers. Payoff Students will: • develop strategies for effectively locating information in texts. 5, W. 1) • I can quote accurately from a text. Choose texts that will allow you to model the desired comprehension monitoring behavior (for example, noticing picture clues, using context clues). Support your students using short texts as practice before diving into more complex materials like textbooks. Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why). Use the following checklist to evaluate students’ understanding: LESSON 8: Making Inferences with quotes & answers my small group objective today is to support answers to implicit questions in the text with quotes from literary forms or features may be puzzling at first. written, spoken, and visual texts Grammar purposeful use of language for effect Composition written, spoken, and visual products Literary Elements Character Detail Diction connotation denotation vocabulary Imagery Point of View person perspective shift (10) Theme Tone tone determined through diction, imagery, detail, Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of primary and secondary sources. 03-05. W. The Reading Standards are organized into four topic areas: and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text 3. Then answer Part B. An important step in the reading process is making inferences based on background knowledge of a text. The focus lessons provide a focused way of introducing specific literary concepts and reading strategies. Lesson Sequence. Students will use their knowledge of Lesson Description Students will be expected to understand the elements of poetry/literature (tone, mood, allusions, diction, repetition and setting) through archival material, the works of Edgar Allan Poe and other Gothic literature and materials. Draws conclusions from literary text (1-3 paragraphs) Evaluates predictions about what will happen next from literary texts (1-3 paragraphs) Understanding Shakespeare: “Sonnet 18” Foundation Lesson—High School About This Lesson This lesson models for students how to perform a literary analysis by showing how devices such as diction, imagery, figures of speech, and sound create thematic meaning. Opening A. capacity would be able to maintain more information actively than would individuals with a . Teaching students close reading strategies, guided reading, shared reading, and the use of graphic organizer to make inferences as they read fiction or nonfiction texts Making Inferences using Non-Fiction Text plus Close Reading Inferencing Strategies | Drawing Conclusions and Making Inferences using Non-Fiction Text and Close Reading Lesson inferences. 1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. To vary methods, increase engagement, and get potentially restless Running Head: NONFICTION UNIT PLAN 1 -organizing ideas and details effectively. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. In this lesson sequence, students look . 4 Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases by using context clues, analyzing meaningful word parts, and consulting general and specialized reference materials as appropriate. , narrative poetry, lyrical evidence to support particular points in a text”). 2 Analyze a given literary text to make, revise, and confirm predictions and draw conclusions. Apply III words in To Kill a Mockingbird by using a vocabulary square. Get animated 7th grade language arts lessons, printable worksheets and student-paced exercises for homeschool, afterschool or skill building. This lesson will also introduce the critical focus question and prompt for the final assignment — a presentation that answers the critical focus question. 10 Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences. This guide outlines all the Montana Standards for English Language Arts and Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects. Teacher Notes Drawings and equations help us solve word problems in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities. Theme: Round Table Legends Using Details to Support Inferences in Literary Texts Lesson 10 + = CCLS RL. They develop the ability to distinguish key (thematic) details from all other details. Baa Baa Black Sheep Lesson-retelling story (more great stories ENGLISH II END OF COURSE EXAM REVIEW GUIDE This review guide was written by the Reading Language Arts Department to help students as they prepare for the English II End of Course Exam. RL. Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. Writers of arguments, newspaper reporters, literary critics, and other writers of prose know what powerful rhetorical tools quotations can be when they are used to prove a point, influence an attitude, illustrate a concept, or reinforce an idea. Huntsville City Schools Pacing Guide 2017-2018 Course . 6. With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a story. Aug 23, 2018 Help your students make inferences using text features and quotes as evidence. T. I can use evidence from literary texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. 1: Quote accurately from a text when Supporting Inferences About Literary Texts Lesson 12 Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted. One way to simplify instruction is to teach inferences using picture clues. I created this video to be used with a second video, When students read nonfiction texts, they will need to make inferences using text features and quotes as evidence. E2. 1 RL. Lesson vocabulary words from the Reading/Writing word wall: questioning, inference, literal, literature, fable, plot; Set up the . ELAR TEKS Figure 19 | 3 Comprehension Skills in Figure 19 for Grades K–5 Figure: 19 TAC §110. 1) Effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about sixth-grade topics, texts, and issues. W. MythI can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about sixth grade topics, texts, and issues. 10 By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9-10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. text. Read and comprehend proficiently at grade level with : increasing challenge in text difficulty and complexity (e. Apply grade 5 reading standards to literature (e. 2B) Establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (3. Self- Questioning Using the QAR Strategy—In this lesson plan, students will define and. An additional focus of this unit is on using details from two texts to build a deeper understanding of content. (B) ask relevant questions, seek clarification, and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text; and (C) establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e. 2C) Establish purposes for reading selected texts (Fig19A) Ask literal, interpretive and evaluative Supporting details are reasons, examples, facts, steps, or other kinds of evidence that explain a main idea. Provide reasons that are supported by facts from texts and/or other . This is a model for their next assignment. 1 December 2013 Page 1 of 3 Nevada Academic Content Standards - Resource Page. Observe students and assess through your anecdotal observations and notes whether students are able to make inferences. 1 Lesson 4: Relationships in Scientific and Technical Texts RI. 2) Trimester Needs Support Approaching Standards Meets Standards Exceeds Standards how) concerning key details in a literary text. ) Ask students if these texts contained technical words that were difficult to understand. help identify details the volunteers may have missed. Teacher outlines the objectives of the lesson and explains what will happen during each of the 3 parts of the course. Preparing an outline of a passage often helps you understand and see clearly the New Jersey Student Learning Standards for English Language Arts . 4 Introduction to Reading Strategies and Literary Elements • Grade 8 Content of Booklet The Reading Strategies and Literary Elements booklet is composed of reproducible lessons and exercises. About half of all spiders do not build webs to catch prey. How does interaction with text provoke thinking and response? Vocabulary Analyzing a Visual Text Landscape with the Fall of Icarus by Pieter Brueghel About this Lesson This lesson is based on ekphrastic poetry, poems written about works of art. 2 Determine a theme or central idea of a text and analyze in detail its development over the course of the text, including how it emerges and is shaped and refined by specific details W. Make inferences based on textual  Inferences during Reading - edited by Edward J. • examples. Retell stories, including fables and folktales from diverse Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. NYS Common Core ELA & Literacy Curriculum D R A F T Grade 12 • Module 2 • Unit 2 • Lesson 2 Vocabulary Assessment(s) Student learning is assessed via a Quick Write at the end of the lesson. SL. Lesson Lesson Title Long Term Targets Learning Targets Standards Assessment Lesson 1 to support an analysis of Engaging the Reader I can cite text -based evidence literary text. 2 Lesson 3: Using Details to Support Inferences RI. They must write a story that contains inferences. 1112. Even if two pieces of writing are about the same topic, they don’t always present the same ideas. Inside Out & Back Again. cite textual evidence to support inferences in literary text whereas 10 % of students when working with informational text were not proficient. 5(A) paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories 3. K. ELA-Literacy. b2 Determine which piece(s) of evidence provide the strongest support for inferences, conclusions, or summaries or text or an adapted grade appropriate text. (2. Literary Appreciation: Teacher provides students the song lyrics, students underline key words and phrases. 1) • I can support my inferences with evidence from text and L19: Comparing and Contrasting Texts 187 Part 1: Introduction American Icons Comparing and Contrasting Texts Lesson 19 If you’ve ever read two articles about a movie star, you often come away with two totally different impressions. The exercises contain one or two RL. operate once we have finished reading and allow us to answer the question,  Feb 15, 2016 The training was grounded in contemporary literature on situation and the empirical support for the taught reading strategies' effectiveness is Integrating information from these dimensions enables readers to gradually . 3 Solve multi-step word problems posed with whole numbers and having whole number answers using the four operations, including problems in which Understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about how an author’s sensory language creates imagery in literary text and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text. 10) Conclude your essay by identifying a central message or lesson that is conveyed through the character changes and interactions over the course of the novel. The sample answers are merely suggestions of what the hiring committee might be looking for, but obviously, you would need to think about your experience, background, and Integrating Opinion Writing With Evaluating Argument 1. com has a library of 550,000 questions and answers for covering your Provide opportunities for students to work together to make inferences by using nonfiction situations. Older students who make inferences on fictional texts or images show that they are thinking deeper about the material. Key Ideas and Details-Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from text. • become familiar with the main features of the texts they will be using. Look for details. In class discussion, students support their lists with details from the novel. Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e. Lesson with Writing Connection) Malala the Brave, X W 5. Providing an overview of the scope of all the standards from kindergarten through twelfth grade, this guide includes: In this lesson, students review elements of fiction and summarize main events in a story. message or lesson. Encourage them to point to the clues and implicit information in the text that led them . Making Inferences Using Pictures II provides additional practice finding evidence, applying schema, and making inferences. 1: Key Details: Given an inference or conclusion, use explicit details and implicit information from the text to support the inference or conclusion provided. 3 and Events in Stories Model the observation to inference process over and over again, using as many real-life examples as possible. These inferences worksheets will give you or your students practice making and explaining logical Explain your answers by referencing details from the text. Answering the Demands of the Common Core with Ready. Grade Grade-Level Standard Prekindergarten With modeling and support, answer questions about details in a text. Students are expected to analyze the effect of ambiguity, contradiction, subtlety, paradox, irony, sarcasm, and overstatement in literary essays Action Is Character: Exploring Character Traits with Adjectives Overview In this activity, students "become" one of the major characters in a book and describe themselves and other characters, using lists of accurate, powerful adjectives. Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. all three This lesson has two purposes: first, to support students in making connections between informational and literary texts; second, to scaffold students’ thinking in using elements of mythology to determine the theme of a text. Items may provide an inference or information to be supported by the student selecting specific textual evidence. Students will expand on their ability to identify central ideas by identifying how those themes are shaped and conveyed by particular details. Teachers should explicitly teach students the definitions, components, and examples of inferencing and drawing conclusions, from a text (see attached example comics). 2context of the common theme of the poem texts to and the other informational support texts, what is the informatio value of selection,hard work? andCite evidence from content. Essential Questions Standard Interview Questions, Possible Answers & Tips! I compiled a list of standard questions a candidate might be asked when applying for an elementary teaching position. • evidence. Always support your inferences with details from the text. Key Ideas and Details Read closely to determine what a text states explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from a text. 5) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. i3 Support inferences, opinions, and conclusions using evidence from the text including illustrations. Kindergarten: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in text. If you’ve looked for resources in the same places that I have, you probably haven’t been too happy with what you found. Students will present claims and findings, sequencing of ideas logically and using pertinent descriptions, facts, and details to accentuate main ideas or themes; use appropriate eye contact, adequate volume, and The Acellus High School English I course provides a detailed investigation of literary techniques and devices using classics from American and English literature as examples. two texts and compare dialogue and circumstances from the informational text to a part of the fictional text. 10(b) 19 TAC Chapter 110. Grade 1 Analyze literary text development. To read critically, students need to be able to read with an eye to discerning the author’s • Comprehending structure and elements of literary genre: fiction • Comprehending how author’s sensory language creates imagery in literary text • Analyzing how words, images, graphics, and sound work together to impact meaning • Writing literary texts • Using elements of the writing process to compose text. Teaching “The Most Dangerous Game” There was no sound in the classroom as you sat there trying to think up lesson plans for “The Most Dangerous Game” but the muffled throb of the fan that cooled your sweat as you tried to think of “Most Dangerous Game” activities, and the swish and ripple of the machetes your supervisor planned on bringing to your class for your first official 9th/10th Grade ELA Curriculum Map [Back to Top] including evidence from the text as support explain how specific details from the text refine or create subtle distinctions that shape the theme use a range of textual evidence to support summaries and interpretations of texts (e. , purpose, plot/subplot, central idea, theme) Reading Literature – 4th Grade Key Ideas and Details CCSS. 3 Unit 2: Key Ideas and Details in Literary Text Lesson 5: Comparing and Contrasting Characters in Drama RL. 1) Supporting Learning Targets Ongoing Assessment • I can make inferences that deepen my understanding of . 86 Lesson 6 Supporting Inferences about Informational Texts ©Curriculum Associates, LLC Copying is not permitted. Students will: review the various elements of fiction–setting, character, plot (conflict, rising action, climax, resolution), and events. 2 Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or Table of Contents Ready® Common Core Program Overview A8 Supporting the Implementation of the Common Core A9 Answering the Demands of the Common Core with Ready A10 The Common Core State Standards’ Approach to Text Complexity A11 Literature: Key Ideas and Details CCR Anchor Standard 3: Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text. 1 - Activities for teaching Reading: Literature, including Reading: Literature worksheets, Reading: Literature practice, questions, assessments, quizzes, tests, lesson plans - aligned to Common Core and state standards - Goalbook Pathways important for reading comprehension, and also more widely in the area of literary criticism and other approaches to studying texts. One of the tasks of English teachers is to teach students how to think in ways that will enable them to be successful The student will demonstrate an ability to understand and analyze literary texts. Justify inferences about main idea by providing supporting details. RL-3 Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or Ignore details that are not important by deleting them or crossing them out. texts, after which they were required to answer inference questions 21 10–16. support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences • cite directly stated evidence to support the analysis of fiction, poetry, nonfiction, and photographs • use evidence to make logical inferences about texts Strategies for Teaching How you use this interactive lesson will reflect your personal teaching style, your instructional goals, and your available technological tools. format to present to other groups in the class. 1 his question has two parts. Provide students with sticky notes, highlighter tape, bookmarks, highlighter pen (for consumable texts), and ask them to annotate something as they read. Findings A key finding of the review was that the ability to draw inferences predetermines The students read two passages from, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz and write inferences for two questions from each. HINT To organize Start studying Lesson 3 Using Details to Support Inferences. Refer explicitly to the text when answering questions 3. Demonstrate understanding of the lesson. Inferencing: Interactive Guided Instruction A R3037 This video will teach students how to make inferences in reading and support them with textual evidence. Example While they read, have students use highlighting tape to identify details that support the inferences they draw. conduct research using Internet reference resources to find accurate and descriptive word choice. Inference in Literature: The Wizard of Oz. b. 3 hort ResponseS Explain how and why the use of the potato spread to other countries. Formatted by the Polk Bros Foundation Center for Urban Education, with key terms boldfaced to facilitate planning. 1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. conflict within their stories and be able to present their findings using R. Making Inferences with Nonfiction Texts Resources. Explore how to answer these questions: "What is the central idea of the . 10 Analyze cause-and-effect relationships in literary implicit information from the text to support answers or basic inferences Standards: RL-1, RL-3 (DOK 1, DOK 2) RL-1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. This is why exposing students more frequently to complex literary texts and introducing them to active reading-comprehension strategies are now key components of successful reading instruction. Reading: Literature: Key Ideas and Details www. Standards Support Visual Literacy Instruction Visual literacy is a staple of 21st century skills, the idea that learners today must “demonstrate the ability to interpret, recognize, appreciate, and understand information presented through visible actions, objects, and symbols, natural or man-made. Diving right into the text with limited pre-reading activities ideas, and information to read, examine, and discuss over those days crafting a lesson that scaffolds students and focuses on increasingly complex Scaffolding instruction is a model in which the teacher supports Literature circles . Spiders such as the It shows how you can support an inference using textual evidence. Texts Questions details in literary Answers Key details Predictions inferencesInferences Background knowledge 5 W’s + H questions (who, what, where, when, why and how) Authors include key texts which can help reader ask and answer questions Good readers know a question is different from a statement and 10 Anchor Standards*Same for K-12. 10( A) identify language that creates a graphic visual experience and appeals to the senses Understanding and Analysis of Literary Texts The student will demonstrate an ability to understand and analyze literary texts. With prompting and support, read and comprehend stories and poetry at grade level text complexity or above. An idea with no supporting details is just that, an idea. Suggested mentor texts are provided, graphic organizers, and a variety of strategies to teach inferencing. Review and organize the notes using semantic maps and webs. , identifying clues, using background Students will be able to support their ideas by citing evidence from the text for all claims and inferences Students will be able to annotate texts as they read in order to show comprehension Students will be able to distinguish between evidence that strongly supports a claim or main idea, and details that may be irrelevant or With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. 9 -10. 2 Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. and specific details in a text to support an answer or inference. Describe characters, settings, and major event (s) in a story, using key details. Download, adapt, share. In this unit students also begin longer shared reading. Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas. Lesson 9: Summarizing Literary Texts. *Writing Standard W. DOK 1, 2 Standards: RL-1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. The Common Core Standards for both informational and literature standards when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from text. Lesson 1: Determining Central Idea and Details . make connections between texts. R1. Full Write: In the LITERACY. Work Time A. Gallery Walk/Inferences (10 minutes) B. , “Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in Using “Power Point : Solomon Northup, Twelve Years a Slave, and Analyzing Slave Narratives” which draws from the Biography and Background sections of this lesson and from the essay: "Solomon Northup’s 12 Years a Slave and the Slave Narrative Tradition" give students a short (1–15 minute) background for the lesson. The student is expected to: (A) compose literary texts such as personal narratives, fiction, and poetry using genre characteristics and craft; MAKING INFERENCES: THE FALL OF SAIGON GRADE 8, MODULE 1: UNIT 1, LESSON 1 AGENDA TEACHING NOTES 1. back to top Each lesson has a paired set of texts which often include both a literary text and a paired informational text. 9: Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. INFERRING ABOUT CHARACTER: CLOSE READING OF THE LIGHTNING THIEF (CHAPTER 3) GRADE 6, MODULE 1: UNIT 1, LESSON 5 LONG-TERM TARGETS ADDRESSED (BASED ON NYSP12 ELA CCLS) I can cite text-based evidence to support an analysis of literary text. Inferring. 1. 10 By the end of the year, read and comprehend a variety of literary text. Determine the lesson or moral. Even though the skills of inference will be called upon regularly in lessons  Sep 7, 2015 Our guest blogger shares five tips for practicing inferencing in this guest post. 10 taught throughtout and in small group center. (3) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. In addition to citing text evidence to answer comprehension questions, you can also use text evidence to make inferences. 6 – Students understand, make inferences and draws conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfiction and provide evidence from text to support their understanding. Introduction Using Details to Support Inferences Lesson 3 Read When you read, you can look for what an author says directly. Draw on details and examples from text to support statements about the literary and informational texts (4) Quote from literary and informational texts to support statements about the text (5) Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of what the literary and informational texts say explicitly as well as inferences drawn from texts (6) Ask students for examples of using technical texts at home or at work. 2. , “Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the analyses, inferences, and claims on explicit and relevant evidence from the texts. Students in the sixth grade learn how to summarize texts by evaluating key details in which the central idea or theme is located. (W. Drawing Inferences Game – This fun game can be played in pairs or teams. Retell stories, including key details, and demonstrate understanding of their central message or lesson. use of information from outside the text, from the reader's existing background while comprehension practice had resulted in an improvement of 10 months. Students respond to the following prompt, citing textual evidence to support analysis and inferences drawn from the text. Find the right K-12 lesson plans - for free. Teaching Through Close Reading: Historical and Informational Texts An Online Professional Development Seminar Lucinda MacKethan Professor of English, Emerita, North Carolina State University National Humanities Center Fellow 1984-85 Very soon after I went to live with Mr. Unit 6 : Integration of Knowledge and Ideas in Literature RI. Academic Talk. explore perspective by writing descriptive word lists from the point of view of a character in a novel they've read recently. Tips and Resources answers. Refer to details and examples in a text 9 -10. 4 Reading Strategies for Informational Texts A complex society is dependent every hour of every day upon the capacity of its people at every level to read and write, to make difficult judgments, and to act in the light of extensive information. 9 Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably. Objectives • Over the course of 5 days (50-minute periods),students will gain an Lesson 12 Supporting Inferences About Literary Texts. Study. 2) Support your essay with details from the text. Understand II • This lesson provides additional scaffolding for students as they learn how to take notes using the structured notes format. Reading Closely to Build Background Knowledge: “Myths and Legends” based details to make inferences about themes, characters, and author’s craft as they Use Text Evidence. A9. Inferencing. Useful strategies, clearly taught, can empower readers to approach literary texts purposefully, 12-3: Supporting Inferences about Literary Texts. E: Help students determine whether their inferences make sense or need to be adjusted based on evidence from the text. In this lesson, you will learn how to draw inferences from the text by citing evidence that explains a character's decision. g Compare and contrast the characteristics that distinguish a variety of literary and informational texts. 3 Lesson 6: Comparing and Contrasting Settings RL. review how to summarize information found in text. This can be tricky because drawing inferences from the text. Grade 2 Analyze literary text development. Infer the implied main idea from one or more related texts. TEKS 3. • I can explain what a text says through information in the text. support their answers. DesCartes: A Continuum of Learning is the exclusive copyrighted property of NWEA. Key Ideas and Details: CCSS. h Compare and contrast similar themes, topics, and/ or patterns of events in literary and informational texts to develop a multicultural perspective Snowflake Bentley TEKS 5 - Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre: 5. By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and define the literary term "character trait" and explore how to provide details that support their inferences. This would be an interesting and fun way for students to practice reading, and critical thinking skills. org | Page 4 of 5 ©2013 NWEA. b1 Use two or more pieces of evidence to support inferences, conclusions, or summaries of text or an adapted grade appropriate text. Students understand, make inferences and draw conclusions about the varied structural patterns and features of literary nonfi ction and respond by providing evidence from text to support their understanding. 1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves to the text as the basis for the answers. Lesson Objective: Cite specific evidence from informational text to support reasoning. 2 With prompting and support, retell familiar stories, including key details. The ability to recognize inference is an important critical thinking skill essential to reading comprehension. 1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. Each lesson plan follows the teach, practice, and apply instructional approach to support students as they build meaning from texts. Objective #7 – USING DETAILS TO SUPPORT INFERENCES IN LITERARY TEXTS (LAFS. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. Insert a topic sentence to begin the summary. and Part B requires the student to use the text to support the answer in in the paper-based, accommodated version of the ELA Reading assessments in Grades 4-10. Auld, she very kindly commenced to teach me the A, B, C. Compare and contrast the settings in myths and traditional folktales. , Thompson, J. 53) OVERVIEW (11) Composition: listening, speaking, reading, writing, and thinking using multiple texts–genres. Ask students to note similarities and differences between the texts based on their lists of evidence. Initiate and participate effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on grades 9–10 topics, texts, and Grade 8 ELA Unit Text Support Resources Module 1 - Week 1-2 (Week 1, 2 Weeks) Module 1 - Week 1-2 (COLLECTION 1) "Culture and Belonging" Week Overview This lesson builds on students’ understanding of the elements of fiction by having them draw conclusions about folklore. 05 respond to individual and multiple texts by Key Ideas and Details Standard 1 Anchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from text. (RI) and Responding to Literature (RL) standards were merged in the revised Grade . By the end of grade 8, read and comprehend history/social studies texts in the grades 6-8 text complexity band independently and proficiently. APPROVED FACILITY SCHOOLS CURRICULUM GUIDE SUBJECT: Reading GRADE: 5 Strand/Concept Student Friendly Learning Objective Level of Thinking Academic Student Expectation Vocabulary January 2014 6/16/15 16 Colorado SS: Locate information to support opinions, predictions, inferences, and identification of the author’s message or theme. Why do readers use details from the text to support their understanding of the text examples from text should be used as evidence to support inferences I make is stated directly in the text and can be used to help me find an answer. 8th Grade –Reading Standards for Literature 8th Grade q Draw inferences q Support inference using several including analogies or allusions to other texts. 1 Key Details: Given an inference or conclusion, use explicit details and implicit information from the text to support the inference or conclusion provided. 1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Block 1: Read Literary Texts 1, 2 MC, MS, HT • Use explicit details and information from the text to support answers and basic inferences in highly complex texts. (RI. From there, they work towards full comprehension of the text by learning to Often students infer answers without being aware they are engaged in inference. Some Making Connections Mentor Texts. CENTRAL IDEAS: Identify or summarize central ideas/key events or procedures and details that support them. 1) message/lesson' is eliminated at this level for. 1) I can describe how the characters change throughout a literary text. • NGLS uses Grade 9-10 RL, (RI. English Grade 10 Second Nine Weeks . The anchor literary texts represent a variety of text types and genres including but not limited to humorous fiction, myth, plays, historical fiction, fantasy, realistic fiction, poetry, folktales, fables and legends. 2a-d, W. To improve their comprehension of complex literary texts, students must of view , setting, and key events and details, to sequencing, making inferences, and using marked passage and sample answers to its related questions. • inference. and locate facts and details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence In this six week unit, students will begin to read literature more critically and to make inferences that come from both the stated and implied features of the texts they read. ” Unit 4, Lesson 10, Think Aloud Search our free collection of high-quality PreK - 12 ELA and Math materials, for specific lessons or topics within a grade. 4 Fluently add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers using the standard algorithm OA. sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve  No evidence which directly answers these questions was identified. The student uses genre characteristics and craft to compose multiple texts that are meaningful. a combination of shorter literary and informational texts which explore a similar theme. • I can support my inferences about Chapter 3 of To Kill a Mockingbird with the strongest evidence from the text. 3) Lesson plan format adapted from Learning-Focused Strategies. 1: Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. F. Sensory Details Includes details to help the reader visualize what is happening. 9) I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth-grade topics, texts, and issues. (3. incorrect answers to questions in an attempt to analyse any patterns that may emerge relating. Text Types : The items assessing this standard may be used with one or more grade-appropriate informational texts. using the text to support their inferences, whereas novices tended to repeat . Common Core ELA 8 Scope and Sequence Unit Lesson Lesson Objectives We Shall Not Be Moved: Monitoring Comprehension Use background knowledge about a historical event to understand the context of a text Monitor comprehension through re-reading Determine the author's purpose in an informational text Making Inferences in a Text about the Iditarod • Distinguish important details from irrelevant details • Recognize and select literary elements for analysis (such as diction, tone, imagery, figurative language, motif) • Draw inferences from the text to support textual analysis • Support all claims with textual evidence of how the text explicitly uses details to support key ideas CCSS. Choose texts on topics that students are likely to have some background knowledge in. • Create a template that describes the main features of the texts, and post it in the classroom so that students can refer to it. , "Compare and contrast two or more characters, settings, or events in a story or a drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e. As reflected in the past two years of state assessment data, 61 % of students were unable to support literary text inferences during 2014 and 65% unable to do so in 2015. 3, RL. (2) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Theme and Genre. NT. Foundation Lesson . story, using key details. Demonstrates understanding of the text. (2008) personal opinions or judgments. Cross-Genre Lesson: Exploring a Thematic Idea in Informational and Literary Texts Foundation Lesson About this Lesson Tracing an idea across multiple texts, synthesizing information presented in different formats, and evaluating themes and patterns from numerous sources are college readiness skills that Items may ask the student to use details from the text to explain what the text states explicitly. Focusing on a rich text, RL. Write Use the space below to write your answer to the question on page 83. Consider texts of various genres. Mount Vernon City School District MASTER ELA 5 Module 2B RI. Evaluate the metacognitive process of actively reading, making complex inferences, and synthesizing inferences Throughout each bend, students will continue to work on determining the central message of a text, describing characters in-depth using details from the text and illustrations, and identifying words and phrases that appeal to the senses. Text: No text used for this lesson. – Write your answers, using specific evidence from the text to support your thinking. Common Core State Standard(s) CCSS. 10(A) identify language that creates a graphic visual experience and appeals to the senses Lesson 1 Making Inferences: The Fall of Saigon •I can cite text -based evidence that provides the strongest support for an analysis of literary text. 4 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Connecting Details and Inferences to Guiding Questions (10 minutes) 3. The Effects of Time-Induced Stress on Making Inferences in Text participants ( aged 10-11 years) on a series of computer screens. The resources below have been created to assist teachers' understanding and to aid instruction of this standard. 1) • I can effectively engage in discussions with diverse partners about eighth -grade topics, texts, and issues. 1 / RL. L. • I can read closely and find answers that require an inference. You can also use what you already know and details from the text to NMTA Reading: Using Literary Texts Chapter Objectives. Use these words to talk about the text. I used a company planning guide to prepare a presentation at work. The activities are structured and sequenced to allow all students, including English language learners and students reading below grade level, independent exposure to the texts, while also supporting Language Arts 10 - ELA2065 Scope and Sequence Unit Topic Lesson Lesson Objectives Literary Analysis: Structure Skills Lesson: Structure Examine how an author reveals purpose through choice of genre Analyze how an author develops a work, including the choice of details and the organization of ideas Short Story: "The Colomber" by Dino Buzzati Key Ideas and Details . Inferences Worksheets Making inferences is a skill with which students often need much practice. SWBAT ask and answer questions about the plot of a story, using information from the text and schema, to make inferences about the story elements. Lesson 1 Using Your Brain: A Gateway Activity Outcomes 1. T Part A Start studying Lesson 12 Supporting Inferences About Literary Texts. 1); Why is it important to use information from the text to support my inference? * Taught through small group Literature Circles and whole group reading lessons: RF. When reading informational text, it is important to cite textual evidence to support your analysis of the most important details and examples in a nonfiction text. Routines and Procedures: In advance, create charts with paired quotes. 9. O'Brien April 2015. 9a: Apply grade 5 Reading standards to literature (e. Major Reading Skills: Identifying, analyzing, evaluating, and connecting story elements. Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills for English Language Arts and Reading b. Language Arts 10 - ELA2065 Scope and Sequence Unit Topic Lesson Lesson Objectives Dealing with Difficulty Literary Analysis: Figurative Language and Imagery Skills Lesson: Figurative Language and Imagery Recognize and understand the significance of various literary devices, including figurative language and imagery Making Inferences and Drawing Conclusions: Use knowledge, information, and ideas from literary or expository texts to make inferences about the text (e. support. Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. A describe the characteristics of various forms of poetry and how they create imagery (e. Students are expected to distinguish between fiction and nonfiction. and other texts and support answers with evidence from text; and (C) establish purpose for reading selected texts and monitor comprehension, making corrections and adjustments when that understanding breaks down (e. May 2, 2016 provides stakeholders with information about the scope and function of the . With guidance and support, self-select texts for personal . Students will compare and contrast the similarities and differences between texts at the end of the unit but should be challenged to notice similarities and differences as they encounter new texts over the course of the unit. Using Dramatic Action to Define Inferring Title of Text Lesson Plan Notes to Build Next Lesson Select the materials. Grade PreK: With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about a story or poem read aloud. at craft and structure: what authors do to make a piece of writing hang together. They are creating writing pieces that encourage readers to make inferences because you can't WRITE an inference. In this lesson plan, which is adaptable for grades 3-8, students use BrainPOP resources to gain a basic understanding of geologic and weather related natural disasters. Screen 12: Make Inferences from an Informative Text Before revealing any answers, discuss each sentence ending, take a vote on which answer is correct (either with a show of hands or via an interactive response system), and enlist students to provide details from the text to support their views. Draft a summary and revise it based on feedback, in written or oral form, using recording devices. College and Career Readiness Anchor Standard 10 for Reading: Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. • details. 1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences … Cite Details to Support Literary Analysis (2 out of 3) details on (2 out of 3) texts. Making Inferences in Fiction Texts Resources. Review Learning Targets (5 minutes) 2. 10: By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poetry, at the high end of the grades 2-3 text Making Inferences. 1) Chapter 1 Lessons 3-4: "I Accidentally Vaporize My Pre-Algebra Teacher" I can make inferences about Percy in order to understand him as the narrator of this story. Anchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from text. 5 Analyze in detail the structure of a specific paragraph in a text, including the role of particular sentences  Inferring supporting details – guessing about additional facts the author of background knowledge and explicitly stated information from the text to answer. details about stories and other texts and support answers with evidence from text (3. 10) Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Literary Nonfiction. This strategy guide will help you choose text that is appropriate for close reading and to plan for instruction that supports students' development of the habits associated with careful, multi-engagement reading of literary prose and poetry. 10 – By the end of the year, read and comprehend literature, including stories and poetry, in the grades 2-3 text complexity band proficiently , with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range. Fisher & Frey (2012) remind us that “the practice of English Language Arts Standards » Reading: Informational Text » Grade 9-10 » 1 Print this page. 10 Reading/Comprehension of Literary Text/Sensory Language. Lesson 12 Supp orting Inferences About Literary Texts 181 Think Use what you learned from reading the science fiction story to respond to the following questions. Essential Questions. Recognize that the background knowledge upon which inferences are drawn will be different for each student. enjoyment, interest, and academic tasks. 1 Analyze the details that support the expression of the main idea in a given literary text. Lesson 2: Summarizing Informational Texts RI. Jun 7, 2019 Here are some ideas for teaching making inferences from what you read and see . Paraphrase the themes and supporting details of fables, legends, myths, or stories; and 5. Texas TEKS Standards Third Grade English Language Arts resources . literary text and/or media, using key details to identify the theme. The National Curriculum lays much emphasis on the skills of inference, especially at Key Stages 2 and 3. With prompting and support, read prose and poetry of appropriate complexity for grade 1. To build a foundation for college and career readiness, students must read widely and deeply from among a Mount Vernon City School District Calendarized Fourth Grade Map Expeditionary Learning Module 1 Grammar: Grammar: Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking. Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. Thompson, M. This is an informational lesson. 6A – evaluate the role of syntax and diction and the effect of voice, tone, and imagery on a speech, literary essay, or other Troup County School System English/Language Arts Curriculum Map 10th grade Literature and Composition Thematic Unit # 2—Survival, Endurance, and the Loss of Innocence Supporting details are used to explain and support the main idea of a sentence, paragraph, essay, or even story. lesson 10 using details to support inferences in literary texts answers

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